Diverse Magazine

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COMBATTING MODERN DAY SLAVERY

A comprehensive approach through laws, education and international cooperation is needed to end modern-day slavery, the President of the General Assembly, Nassir Abdulaziz Al-Nasser, said recently. “The terrible impacts of slavery and the slave trade are still felt to this day,” Mr. Al-Nasser said in remarks delivered on his behalf to a General Assembly meeting to commemorate the International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade. “They have devastated continents and countries. They have led to profound social and economic inequalities, and have given rise to hatred, racism and prejudice.” In 2007, the General...

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BRITAIN’S DIVERSITY WAS LAUDED DURING THE OLYMPICS. BUT NO LONGER

There’s a glaring gap between the chants we heard at last summer’s Games and where Britain has subsequently arrived… Nostalgia for something that happened only a year ago must surely represent our accelerated culture reaching warp speed. But here we are: marking the first anniversary of the London Olympics, and the magic of that event and the subsequent Paralympics are once again being celebrated. “Will anything ever feel this good again?” read a wonderfully understated headline in the Telegraph. To which the answer is: perhaps not, but 120,000 tickets for the Anniversary Games sold out in 75 minutes, which suggests that even the...

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RAMADAN IN NUMBERS

Why does the duration of Ramadan change? How long will Muslims in different countries have to fast? Get the key numbers here… 7,504,984 tonnes of dates produced Photograph: Murad Sezer/AP Muslims traditionally use dates to break their fast, so sales of this sweet fruit soar during Ramadan. Medjool and Halawi may sound exotic but there are some more surprisingly named date variants because sellers often give the best crop gimmicky names. In 2009, the Obama date could be found after the US President’s trip to Egypt. In 2011, buyers could purchase the Tahrir Square date and this year, according to Al Arabiya...

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CHRISTIANS’ DISCRIMINATION CASES REJECTED

Shirley Chaplin, Gary McFarlane and Lillian Ladele lose legal tussle at Strasbourg court over workplace discrimination Three British Christians who argued that their beliefs saw them wrongly disciplined by their employers for actions such as refusing to counsel same-sex couples have lost their legal battle at the European court of human rights. Shirley Chaplin, Gary McFarlane and Lillian Ladele had their appeals to the Strasbourg court rejected in January as part of the same ruling as that in which Nadia Eweida, a British Airways check-in attendant, won her fight against being banned from wearing a cross at work. The three sought to resolve...

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MULTI-PRONGED ASSAULT ON RACISM – NOT JUST THE EDL

Following the EDL’s mobilisation after the Woolwich attack, we must broaden the fight against racism in all its forms Tuesday, May 28th’s setback in London – and it has to be seen as a setback for anti-racists given that they were substantially outnumbered by EDL supporters, and forced to weather a shower of bottles while being kettled – should provoke some rethinking. These are some points that immediately come to mind, which I’ll flesh out and redact in the next few days. 1. This is a long-term fight that has to be conducted on many different levels. It is not just...

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TAKE A HARD LOOK AT RACISM, SEXISM AND HOMOPHOBIA ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES

My recent experience at Dartmouth College has shown me that we are still not the society we want to be Like many universities, Dartmouth College has venerated traditions. The annual Dimensions show – a festive, student-organized musical revue performed to entice admitted, but undecided, students to come to Dartmouth – is one such tradition. Many prospective students decide to attend Dartmouth because of how much they enjoy the performance. On 19 April, a group of students calling themselves “#Realtalk” interrupted the show, protesting sexual assault, racism, and homophobia at the university. It was a real jolt for the campus community. President...

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THE WOMAN ON A MISSION TO EXPOSE SEXUAL ABUSE

When film-maker Anna Hall found out about the exploitation of girls in Telford, she had to bring the evidence to a wider public Anna Hall is nothing if not patient. It was 17 years ago, over a cup of coffee in her adopted home city of Leeds, when she first heard that some British Pakistani men were grooming, raping and trafficking young white girls. She immediately knew she should bring the evidence to a wider public, yet it took three years for the film-maker to win a commission from Channel 4 and many more to make three harrowing documentaries, culminating...

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OVERVIEW OF RECENT RACIALLY MOTIVATED ATTACKS

An overview of racially motivated attacks perpetrated by members of the far-right and convictions over the last few months. Just a few months ago, two women in Plymouth were sentenced in February for their part in an EDL mob-attack which took place in 2011. The two were part of a group who attended an EDL meeting, got drunk, went outside and screamed prolonged racist abuse and chanted ‘EDL’ at a Kurdish family who, in terror, barricaded themselves in their takeaway. Some of the attackers stood kicking at the door, others threw pint-glasses into the shop, one of which shattered near...

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MULTICULTURALISM HAS WON THE DAY. LET’S MOVE ON

Rightwing scaremongering over immigration has failed as 70% of Britons now believe a multicultural society is a good thing. It’s official: 45 years after Enoch Powell made his “rivers of blood” speech – the fearmongers have lost the war, while those who think Britain is stronger with a multiracial and multicultural identity have won. Don’t believe me? The former Tory chairman Lord Ashcroft did a representative survey of British ethnic minority voters last week, and found that 90% think we have become a multicultural country, and a similar proportion say this is a good thing. A broader national survey found that 90% of all...

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SIGNIFICANT PREJUDICES TOWARDS ETHNIC AND RELIGIOUS MINORITIES REMAIN IN BRITAIN

Major progress has been made in combating racism since the murder of black teenager Stephen Lawrence 20 years ago, but significant prejudices towards ethnic and religious minorities remain, a survey reveals. The number of Britons who now say that they believe black and Asian people face substantial discrimination has almost halved compared with figures from 1991. But while a majority indicate that they would have no issues with neighbours, managers, medical professionals or political leaders from different ethnic backgrounds, there is still some social resistance. The results of the survey, from the thinktank British Future, are published as Doreen Lawrence, Stephen’s mother, says in an...