Diverse Magazine Group

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Fawcett Society Briefing: Gender Pay Gap by Ethnicity in Britain

Many minority ethnic women ‘left behind’ by pay gap progress Pakistani & Bangladeshi women see biggest overall gender pay gap at 26% Black African women experience largest full-time gender pay gap at 19.6% Today (March 6, 2017) the Fawcett Society publish a new analysis of the gender pay gap by ethnicity, charting progress over more than 25 years. The analysis reveals real inequalities, with some minority ethnic groups making great strides while pay for others lags far behind. Fawcett has also calculated the gap within ethnic groups as well as the gap between minority ethnic women and White British men...

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The truth behind rising disabled employment: cuts, death and zero-hour contracts

The disability employment gap is narrowing, but this is against a backdrop of sanctions, funding cuts and insecure employment Lawrence Bond suffered from a heart condition, shortness of breath and struggled with mobility. His GP had reportedly also made two referrals for mental health services. But, despite all that, the 56-year-old was declared “fit to work” at an assessment in July. As a result, Bond’s benefits were slashed and he was told to get down to his local Jobcentre in Kentish Town to look for work. He launched an appeal against the ruling, but had no other options while he...

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Firms urged to publish ethnic breakdown

A government-backed review has called for many firms to publish a breakdown of their workforce by race and pay. The report by Baroness McGregor-Smith said the economy could receive a £24bn annual boost if businesses stamped out ethnic inequality. It found that people from black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds were still often disadvantaged at work. But the government has ruled out legislation on such a breakdown, opting for a voluntary approach instead. “The time for talk on race in the workplace is over, it’s time to act”, said Baroness McGregor-Smith, whose report was commissioned by the former business secretary...

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3 ways business culture differs around the world

Planning on doing business internationally? Here’s how business manners differ across the globe   TABLE TROUBLES One place where cultural differences between international business partners is conspicuous is the dinner table. For example, a Japanese executive may make slurping sounds while eating or a Chinese counterpart may leave food on their plate at the end of a meal. Such behaviour should not be interpreted as bad manners. In Japan, slurping indicates the food is being enjoyed and in China, if a person eats all the food on their plate, it may be interpreted that they are still hungry and would like...

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Why it’s still not ‘Mission Accomplished’ for LGBT workers

Award-winning journalist Matthew Todd gives his verdict on the current situation facing LGBT employees. Although it has never been easier to be Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender, a significant number of LGBT employees are still afraid to ‘come out’ at work because they fear this will lead to harassment and damage their career opportunities. Research supports this fear although figures vary between industries, with some sectors appearing to be more homophobic than others. Many colleagues are too scared to speak up against the homophobic harassment, which they witness others experience. However, there are numerous organisations such as the UK’s leading...

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Law must be tougher over dress code discrimination, say MPs

MPs conclude ‘troubling’ cases of sexism, including forcing women to wear high heels or revealing clothes, are evidence Equalities Act 2010 is inadequate Women who face demands at work to wear high heels, makeup or revealing outfits require a new legal framework to halt such discrimination, a parliamentary report has concluded. Two Commons’ committees have called for a review of current equality legislation after gathering evidence of sexist instructions issued to hundreds of female employees but not to their male colleagues. The findings published on Wednesday contradict reassurances from Theresa May that current equality laws are adequate. When she was...

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The women-led startups smashing the glass ceiling

“What’s the appeal of entrepreneurship? Personally, it’s freedom. I don’t have to be at work at 9am or take lunch at 1pm. I can opt out of the things I don’t like,” says Natalie Campbell, serial entrepreneur and co-founder of consultancy A Very Good Company. Campbell started her first venture, a franchise of fashion chain Morgan de Toi, while at university. Now, alongside her consultancy, she is a director and board member of a number of other companies. Enjoying serial success in her early 30s, Campbell is among a successful cohort of women serial entrepreneurs – 38% of serial entrepreneurs...

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Companies in the North East are leading the way in diversity, business chief says

CBI regional director Sarah Glendinning on the regional firms highlighting the benefits of diversity in the workplace Last week I hosted a CBI roundtable with senior business leaders from the region to discuss the Gender Pay Gap. If approved by Parliament in the coming months, the current Gender Pay reporting regulations will come into force in April 2017. Many companies – such as PwC and Virgin Money – have already taken steps to measure and report their gender pay data, and others are already aware of the changes that will come into force. At the CBI we are working hard...

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As Obama Departs, We Owe Him Our Thanks

The final days of the Obama presidency are upon us. His popularity is rising with the economy, and with the increasingly stark contrasts to his successor. It is worth being clear about the legacy that he leaves behind. Obama came to office facing the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. The global financial system teetered on collapse; the auto industry faced bankruptcy; the economy was shedding 400,000 jobs a day. He also inherited the catastrophe George Bush had created with the debacle in Iraq and government misrule dramatized by the shame of Katrina and New Orleans. Now, eight years later,...

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Black judge claims he was discriminated against by disciplinary panel

Judge Peter Herbert to receive an apology and a dressing down after publicly saying racism ‘sometimes’ exists in the judiciary.. A disciplinary panel has recommended that a prominent black judge should receive both an apology and “formal advice” – a dressing down – after its members found he committed misconduct in a speech he made referring to a fellow judge and that the matter had not been handled well. While Judge Peter Herbert welcomed the apology he also said his treatment by the judiciary had made him feel “like a nigger” and is appealing against the findings of the Judicial...