Diverse Magazine

Farzana-Baduel 0

THE BUSINESS CASE FOR DIVERSITY

I started Curzon PR, a public relations and strategic communications agency six years ago in 2009. My entry into public relations seemed to coincide with a time when the industry, that had for so long prided itself on the modern, progressive and cosmopolitan image it had cultivated, seemingly woke up to the fact that it had an incredibly poor record with regards to diversity. The most recent figures indicate that just eight percent of PR practitioners are from an ethnic minority background, and while the industry generally has a good record with gender diversity, it still remains overwhelmingly male dominated...

tim-cook 0

IS THERE A DIVERSITY DIVIDEND?

Is there a diversity dividend? That was the question that posed in a special Talking Business programme from the World Economic Forum, in Davos. There is evidence, for instance, that boards of directors with greater diversity generate more dividends. That means greater returns to shareholders and fewer bonuses paid to managers. So, it matters who’s at the top. Yet, only 4% of bosses in the UK financial services industry and 4.6% of chief executives of S&P 500 companies are women, and there are just six black CEOs of Fortune 500 companies. With respect to gender, there are numerous studies that...

nancy astor 0

ALL-WOMEN SHORTLISTS ARE SEEN AS TERRIFYING. BUT SO IS THE STATUS QUO

It’ll be 2055 before we get gender equality in the House of Commons. Politics already has an invisible quota system – one that shuts down diversity Sometimes it’s not a matter of sitting patiently, it’s a matter of working out how long you have got. You begin to realise that what you thought would happen “naturally” has not happened at all. I would have predicted by 2015 that about half of the people in important jobs – in public life, in parliament, in business, on the telly – would be vaguely female. It’s a meritocracy, right? Girls are doing better...

gay-marriage 0

GAY OR STRAIGHT, LET’S EMBRACE THE LANGUAGE OF MARRIAGE EQUALITY

‘Gay marriage’ and ‘sexual preference’ are loaded phrases. There are better and more accurate alternatives Today I got out of my gay bed, kissed my gay boyfriend goodbye, went to the gym with my gay neighbour and then cycled my gay bike to my gay job. Yes, a strange sentence, but to my ear the phrase “gay marriage” sounds just as peculiar. The qualifying prefix is superfluous in every case. Yet “gay marriage” remains acceptable in the house style of many media outlets (including the Guardian). It may not be offensive, but it doesn’t quite sit right. The Australian national...

muslim-mistrust 0

THE GUARDIAN VIEW ON MUSLIMS IN THE WEST: MARGINALISED BY MISTRUST

Ministers should stop boasting about supposed British values. The debate about security in a diverse society needs to be framed in the language of human rights. The book was in the college library, and a student enrolled for the very subject that it covered was spotted picking it up. The scene might not be so common as it was in the pre-Google era, but nor is it – one would hope – so rare as to prompt a college official to instigate a worried conversation, and then call for security. Indeed, the fact that this happened at Staffordshire University makes...

Jonathan Sumption 0

SUMPTION ENCAPSULATES THE LAW’S SEXISM: ONLY QUOTAS CAN CHALLENGE MALE PRIVILEGE

If the supreme court judge thinks women are opting to shun senior judicial posts, he doesn’t understand power Institutional sexism in the legal profession is under scrutiny again following remarks about gender equality in the judiciary by one of the country’s most senior judges. Jonathan Sumption’s views exemplify perfectly what is wrong with the way women in the legal profession are viewed by those in the highest echelons of power. Not only did the supreme court judge forecast in an interview that it would take 50 years to achieve gender equality in the judiciary, he cautioned against doing anything that...

Gender-equality 0

TACKLING GENDER INEQUALITY COULD ADD $12TN TO WORLD ECONOMY, STUDY FINDS

Researchers say extra GDP output could come from reforms, such as allowing more women in workforce in countries where they currently face restrictions. Tackling gender inequality and boosting women’s opportunities in the labour market could add $12tn (£7.8tn) to annual global GDP over the next decade, according to new research. The McKinsey Global Institute has measured gender inequality across 95 countries, using 15 different indicators, including not just women’s role in the workplace, but everything from the availability of contraception to access to bank accounts. The study found that if each country could make progress towards closing the gender gap...

office workers of all ages 0

AGE DIVERSITY EXERCISES FOR TEAMS

With the introduction of Age Discrimination legislation (UK October 2006, and consistent with European law), there is an increased need to raise awareness and to train people about ageism and age discrimination. Here are some ideas for activities and exercises which will highlight the issues. Organise teams and discussions according to your situation. Here are four separate ideas which can be used for exercises and team games. 1. Under age discrimination legislation many customary expressions in written and spoken communications are potentially unlawful if they refer to a person’s age (any age – not only older people) in a negative...

cancer-in-the-workplace 0

DISCRIMINATION AT WORK DUE TO A CANCER DIAGNOSIS

Research has shown that most employers aren’t aware that cancer is covered under the Equality Act 2010 as a disability. Your employer should provide help and support to enable you to do your job. The Equality Act 2010 has replaced discrimination laws in England, Scotland and Wales – including the Disability Discrimination Act – bringing them together under one piece of legislation. These laws protect the rights of workers who suffer from illnesses like cancer. However, research shows only one in five employers is aware of this, so many people go without the support they are entitled to. Almost half...

Ataxia 0

LIVING WITH ATAXIA

“My condition means people always assume I’m drunk…” When my best friend Judy turned 40, she organised a group of us to fly to New York. As the plane was ready to take off, three members of security approached me. “Madam, we’d like to escort you off the plane,” the manager said. “We think you’ve had too much to drink.” “Honestly, I haven’t had a drop,” I protested. They apologised and left me – but I wanted the plane to swallow me up. It had been the same situation when I arrived at the boarding gate, feeling tired and a...

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