Diverse Magazine Group

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ADEREMI V LONDON AND SOUTH EASTERN RAILWAY

Disability discrimination – normal day to day activities   This decision is likely to be helpful to claimants seeking to show they have a ‘disability’. The appeal tribunal stresses that one should look at what the claimant cannot do, rather that what they can. It also criticises a ‘sliding scale’ approach, which might set the bar for claimants too high, and says the statutory guidance may mislead here. And it reiterates that the effect of an impairment on work activities can very much be relevant. In Aderemi v London South East Railway the EAT has overturned the decision of the...

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BOOK REVIEW: PURE PRESSURE

Written by Louis Julienne, this book is a powerful debut novel. Witty yet serious, tragic and joyous, suspenseful and always informative, it manages to combine a broad brush on a centuries-old inner-city community with telling details of individuals that mark the arrival of a new talent to urban fiction. Pure Pressure is the story of Lizzie Leung the widowed matriarch of an extended family at a key moment in her life. Set at the time of the 1981 ‘Toxteth Riots’, the story is largely confined to a few weeks during that sultry summer of 1981 that made headlines throughout the...

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MICHAEL GOVE’S CIVIL SERVICE CUTS ‘TO HIT NON-WHITE, DISABLED AND OLDER WORKERS’

Radical plans by Michael Gove to cut the Department for Education in half will result in a disproportionate number of redundancies among minority ethnic, disabled and older staff, leaked documents show. An internal review of 3,781 departmental staff – which has been handed to the Guardian – shows that one in eight workers define themselves as black or from an ethnic minority. But more than one in three workers described as putting in an unsatisfactory performance are non-white and likely to be sacked. Nearly 15% of staff identified by managers as underperforming have a disability, while only 6% of all...

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EQUAL PAY: BIRMINGHAM CITY COUNCIL V ABDULLA

What does Birmingham City Council v Abdulla mean for equal pay claims? It has been long accepted that the courts and the employment tribunals have concurrent jurisdiction to hear claims for breach of the statutory equality clause in a contract of employment (equal pay claims). lWe consider the implications of the Supreme Court’s decision in Birmingham City Council v Abdullah and others, in which it ruled that 170 women who worked for Birmingham City Council can proceed with equal pay claims against their former employer in the civil courts, where the six-month employment tribunal time limit for bringing a claim had expired. Q...

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HUMAN RIGHTS DAY – 10 NOVEMBER

On 10th December 1948 the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This was followed up in 1950 when the Assembly passed resolution 423 (V) that invited all Member States and interested organisations to adopt 10thDecember as Human Rights Day. The aims of the Declaration were for individuals and societies to strive by progressive measures, both national and international, to secure a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations and to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance. Although the Declaration is broad in its range of political, civil, social, cultural and...

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DAVIES INQUIRY MAY SET FTSE 250 FIRMS TARGETS FOR LEVEL OF WOMEN DIRECTORS

Lord Davies’s inquiry into male dominance in boardrooms is preparing to extend its remit by setting female hiring targets for companies outside the FTSE 100. Peer’s inquiry prepares to advise on female hiring rates as it notes 94 listed companies with all-male boardrooms The former trade minister has asked his advisers to prepare research in preparation for recommending that FTSE 250 businesses should work towards a minimum level of female representation on their boards. The peer’s 2011 report only backed targets for the UK’s 100 largest public companies. Prof Susan Vinnicombe, a member of the inquiry’s steering committee, said: “[Davies] has...

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ONE IN FIVE YOUNG PRISONERS ARE MUSLIM, REPORT REVEALS

Chief inspector of prison Nick Hardwick reports that figure has risen from 13% in 2009-10 The proportion of offenders in youth jails who are Muslim is rising sharply and they now account for more than one-fifth of all inmates, the chief inspector of prisons has said. Nick Hardwick said the figure had risen from 13% in 2009-10 to 21% in 2011-12. He said that while they were less likely to say they felt unsafe in youth jails and more likely to say they were treated with respect, they still felt they were treated significantly worse than non-Muslims. “They reported that...

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BLACK HISTORY MONTH IS BEING SIDELINED

It has successfully helped push racial equality up the political agenda. But now London’s councils are slashing BHM funding I believe we need to look at the future of Black History Month in this country and ask some serious questions. New research reveals that spending on Black History Month by London’s boroughs has dropped by almost half. This is striking because almost half of Britain’s ethnic minorities are in the London area and local authorities might have been expected to take it seriously. The worst examples of these cuts come from Camden, Greenwich and Westminster councils, who have completely scrapped their...

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SLAVERY DISTORTS THE STORY OF BLACK BRITAIN

Black History Month should address the fact that many assume Africans in 16th- and 17th-century England were slaves When I tell people I study Africans in Renaissance Britain, they often reply: “Oh, you mean slaves?” Despite the fact that Black History Month – currently being celebrated – is now in its 25th year, and that it’s more than 60 years since the Windrush brought the first postwar Caribbean migrants, it’s clear that many wrong assumptions about the black presence in Britain are still made. It seems the emphasis on the horrors of slavery, including the commemoration of the Abolition of the Slave...

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NHS ACCUSED OF AGE DISCRIMINATION IN PATIENT SURGERY

Age ‘cut-offs’ in cancer, hernia repairs and joint replacements, Decisions should be based on general health, study says Older people are being denied vital surgery for cancer, hernia repairs and joint replacements because the NHS imposes “cutoffs” for treatment based on age discrimination, a report has warned. Health professionals can be too quick to decide against offering surgery because of “outdated assumptions of age and fitness”, according to the study by the Royal College of Surgeons, the charity Age UK and communications consultancy MHP Health Mandate. Doctors and surgeons should stop using chronological age to assess suitability for a procedure and...