Category: RACE DIVERSITY

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RACISM INCIDENTS AT LIVERPOOL FOOTBALL CLUB

The recent incidents of racism associated with Liverpool Football Club has been heavily debated nationwide. Here we present the views of two fans – our editor, Garth Dallas and Vinny Tomlinson, former Chair Merseyside Black Police Association. Garth Dallas (Editor, Diverse Magazine): “As a huge LFC fan I deliberately reserved judgement on the Suárez case until I felt I had enough information to make an ‘informed statement’. I can now say that I categorically support the verdict and the punishment!! Suárez has not been found guilty of being a racist, because that was not the charge. Rather he was convicted...

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STEPHEN LAWRENCE CASE – TIMELINE

The murder of Stephen Lawrence in south-east London 18 years ago has been the subject of multiple court cases and inquiries. See the timeline below…. 22 April 1993 Stephen Lawrence is stabbed to death in an unprovoked attack by a gang of white youths as he waits at a bus stop in Eltham, south-east London, with his friend Duwayne Brooks. 26 April 1993 Four prime suspects are put under surveillance. 4 May 1993 The Lawrence family complains that police are not doing enough to catch Stephen’s killers. 7 May 1993 The homes of brothers Neil and Jamie Acourt and David...

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NO DAVID STARKEY: BRITAIN IS NOT A WHITE MONOCULTURE

David Starkey can argue until he’s blue in the face that English society is still dominated by a “white monoculture”, but in many of the country’s larger cities, the reverse is literally true – as shown by the changing makeup of their schools. Our analysis of Department of Education data that across the entire Greater London secondary school population, white pupils are now in the minority, with more than half of all London’s secondary schoolchildren coming from ethnic minority or mixed ethnic backgrounds. In some local authorities, mostly in inner London, this has been the case for more than a...

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AFRICAN SLAVERY MUST NOT BE FORGOTTEN

On 23 August we celebrate a vital moment in the abolition of the slave trade – so why has the day received no state support? Britain woke up on 23 August largely ignorant of the fact that it is a national day of remembrance. Four years ago the government declared it the day to remember those millions of African people who were captured, denigrated, enslaved, tortured and murdered, who rebelled and ultimately survived a period rightly seen as the most heinous crime of humankind against humankind in history. But when was the government going to tell us? And what is...

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WE CAN’T INDULGE IN THIS NOSTALGIA. RACISM TODAY IS SUBTLE AND COMPLEX

Black leaders have moved on from the 1980s, and discrimination has changed too To some the past is always golden, the present bleak and the future bleaker. Last week Joseph Harker indulged in a trip down memory lane, reminiscing about the challenges the black community faced during the 80s, and its leadership (For black Britons, this isn’t the 80s revisited. It’s worse, 12 August). In 1985 Bernie Grant’s “connection with local people made him hugely popular and two years later he was elected MP”, says Harker. “Paul Boateng, who had been a campaigning civil rights lawyer, greeted his own election...

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TOXTETH RIOTS 30 YEARS ON: LEROY COOPER SPEAKS OUT

Leroy Cooper will forever be known as the man whose arrest sparked the Toxteth riots. Sat in front of an exhibition of his paintings and collages at Keith’s Wine Bar, in Lark Lane, he said: “It’s been a black cloud hanging over me for years. “I always say to people ‘I wasn’t there’. I was actually arrested in what they call the sparking incident, but I was taken away from the street and was in Risley remand centre for six to eight weeks. “My memory of the riots is being imprisoned, worrying what was going to happen, because I could...

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JIMI JAGNE – MEMORIES OF THE TOXTETH RIOTS

  Jimi Jagne, now 47, recalls the part he played in the Toxteth riots. I was a 17-year-old youth, Toxteth born and bred, and I was actively engaged in the uprisings. At one point, on the penultimate day of the riots, on July 27, I was arrested and subsequently received a conviction for my part in the rioting. Like everyone else, it was a part of what was happening among the residents and the community at the time. There was a long, long history of police trouble. Walking around the community during the daytime was bad enough, but when it...

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TOXTETH RIOTS – 30 YEARS ON PROJECT

On  Friday 1 July 2011, the Merseyside Black History Month Group (MBHMG) kicked off a series of events to mark the 30th anniversary of the 1981 Toxteth Riots with the opening of Toxteth 1981 at the International Slavery Museum, Albert Dock. Toxteth 1981 is a historical photographic exhibition of images of the riots, some being shown publicly for the first time in 30 years. The exhibition closes on 1st July 2012. It is a collaboration between Merseyside Black History Month Group, Writing on the Wall and National Museums Liverpool. Dr Richard Benjamin, head of the International Slavery Museum, said: “The...

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TOXTETH REVISITED, 30 YEARS AFTER THE RIOTS

In July 1981, some of the most violent rioting ever seen in Britain erupted in the Toxteth area of Liverpool. Thirty years on, the local community is still paying the price. After the second night of fire and rage, police burst through the door of the Simon family home in a little terrace along Beaconsfield Street in Liverpool, snatched 13-year-old Michael and flung him on to a pile of other young bodies packed into the back of a van. “I thought I was going to be killed,” recalls Michael. “There were 10 in the van and I was on top...

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CHIEF CONSTABLE JON MURPHY – POLICING THE TOXTETH RIOTS

Merseyside Police’s present chief constable, Jon Murphy, was a PC at the time of the Toxteth riots. Here he recalls the role of the Operation Support Division. We were the reserve which was brought out to try and relieve the pressure on the police who were behind the shields. Most of them were young lads, in a uniform, in shock. They were stood behind the riot shields. We would form behind them at a point. An instruction would be given and bear in mind we didn’t have mobile phones then [and] the radios didn’t work as well . . ....